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How to Come Up with PR Angles for Your Business
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One of the first things I do when I'm talking to a new or potential client is start brainstorming all of the angles that the media or influencers might be interested in about them. I often tell clients that kick-off meetings bring out the journalist in me as I essentially interview them about anything and everything that could be of interest and tie back into their brand, mission or ability to differentiate. In a world that's increasingly driven by consumers voting with their dollars, facts or storylines that the client isn't even thinking about can often be the most compelling, both in terms of getting press attention and in terms of connecting potential customers or users with the brand.

I also find that thinking through these pitch angles can help us make recommendations to the client around the copy that should be on their website, in email sequences, and more. Thinking about how you're going to pitch yourself to target media helps you hone in on your audience and messaging, so even if you're not planning to start the media outreach process now, it's a worthwhile exercise.

To start, here are a few prompts to get you brainstorming potential angles:

Your Background

So many people come to entrepreneurship via unexpected paths, and these backgrounds can make for wonderful stories. They can also help you fit into stories that are more generally appealing. For example, CPAs who start creative endeavors, or parents who start businesses with their kids (I have had three such companies come through my doors lately!), can make for compelling narratives. 

Look at the national landscape of news and see if there's anything you fit into. Tie into national conversations when you can, hot topics like immigration, The American Dream, work/life balance and working parenthood, etc. If your story can be part of a larger narrative, you have a better chance of being picked up.

Your Purpose, Your "Why"

Entrepreneurship is no joke, and most business owners have a more compelling reason for starting their companies than they just woke up one day and decided to do it. Whether it was a big hole in the market or a personal thing they were searching for and couldn't find, or the intrinsic motivation to become their own boss, or an even more profound and far reaching rationale, your purpose and reason for getting up in the morning and working so hard are important parts of your story.

How You're Transforming The Market You're In

Most likely as an entrepreneur, you saw a problem and wanted to solve it. Think about the issues in your market and how you're transforming them, whether you're building a better mousetrap, introducing a totally new idea, bringing choice to a landscape where none previously existed, making a solution more affordable, etc. Framing things to the media in a problem/solution context is helpful in garnering coverage. Anytime you're new and different, and especially if you have the potential to change a market, people want to know more.

The Things You Know Better Than Anyone Else

Pitching yourself as an expert can be a great way to get coverage because you're providing reporters with a source and expertise as opposed to asking them to just write about a product (a harder sell). Sit down and think about all the things you know better than anyone else about your industry or market and develop pitches around those. See something starting to trend or happen that you can alert reporters who cover your beat about? Have a commentary or counterpoint to something you've seen? Think that reporters are missing something that you can provide expert advice on? These are great opportunities for pitching.

How You're Different

It's almost essential for a company to have major differentiators from its competition to get media coverage based purely on the product or service. Think hard about how you're different and what that means for your audience. Are you making something affordable or accessible for the first time? Providing a first-of-its-kind service? Going against the grain of what is typical in the industry? Is yours just prettier, higher quality, more effective or solving a common issue that people have with similar products? Whatever it is that differentiates you can help lead to pitches around flaws in the marketplace, consumer needs and your product.

How to Prepare Your Business for a PR Campaign

Getting amazing press for your company is an invaluable way to improve your brand awareness, increase sales and drive traffic. But before you embark on a PR campaign, you need to make sure your business is ready.

If you’re a Shark Tank fan, you’ve probably visited the site of a featured company the night the show aired, only to be completely unable to access it. The Red Dress Boutique is one company that experienced this incredibly stressful situation - 18 hours of their site being down on their first Shark Tank appearance. Of course, this is an extreme example, but it reminds us all of what’s at stake if we aren’t ready for a press hit when it happens.

As a PR consultant to small businesses and startups, getting their business in shape for press hits is often part of my job, before I ever start media outreach. You often only get one shot at a publication, so you don’t want to waste it. Thinking about starting a PR campaign? Here are a few ways to get your business prepared for media coverage.

Prepare yourself for PR to work
What do you want readers, listeners or viewers to do when they’re exposed to your brand? For most companies, driving traffic to a website or into a retail location is the #1 goal. But you’d be surprised at how many companies don’t think through what will happen when they get some good press.

Make sure that your location or site is prepared to handle whatever increased traffic will result from a media hit.If you’re promoting a grand opening or event at a brick and mortar, be sure you’re staffed sufficiently. Driving traffic online? Make sure your site is working well, loading fast and that there aren’t any broken links or missing contact information. If you’re promoting a particular product, make sure you have the stock to meet increased demand. The amount of prep you’ll need to do depends on the size of the hit, but always be prepared.

Set up a way to capture prospects
If you’re driving people to your website, you’ll want to ensure there’s a way to capture their information if they don’t buy right away. A pop-up with a discount offer or incentive to join your mailing list is a great way to achieve this. If you’re bringing people in-store, you’ll still want to get them on your list so having an incentive for them to leave their information is a great idea.

Be ready to nurture prospects and new customers
If you’ve been considering an email nurturing campaign, now’s the time to implement it. The only thing worse with getting twice-daily spammy emails from a company is signing up for their list and never hearing from them again. Have a plan in place to nurture any new customers, clients or prospects that come your way, whether that’s with an informational email series, discount offer or other regular communications. This is a captive crowd and it’s a perfect opportunity to introduce them to your brand.

Plan additional media outreach or targeted advertising
Have you ever noticed that you’ll hear about a company, and suddenly they’re EVERYWHERE? It’s not by accident. Don’t just rely on a single media hit. Create a campaign. Continue your media outreach to garner additional hits in complementary outlets. Target a Facebook ad campaign linking to your media hits by geography. Perhaps plan a mailer or other ad spend to follow up on your PR campaign, if budget allows.

Leverage your media hits
Include the logos and links to any hits on your website as social proof - what someone else says about you is much more valuable than anything you say about yourself, and when that info comes from a trusted media source, more the better. Be sure to be ready to add these hits to your site and share and promote on social media or printed collateral to get even more mileage out of them.

Whether you’re doing proactive media outreach or just luck out with media interest in your company and brand, being prepared to leverage and capitalize on earned media is essential. Media hits provide an invaluable opportunity to promote your brand, but it’s up to you to take the right steps to make it happen.

PR TIPS: 5 WAYS TO FIND REPORTERS TO COVER YOUR COMPANY

There is so much media out in the world right now that it can be completely overwhelming to figure out how to find the right reporters, writers or producers to cover your company. Public relations is a delicate balance: you need to find an outlet and a writer that reaches your target audience AND who feels you have something interesting enough to say that you make sense to write about.
 
When we start working with a new client, the first thing we do is research. We Google, search Twitter and use our media database to find reporters who we think are likely to cover our clients, see what they’ve written in the past and create a media list that includes their contact information, notes about prior coverage and our communications record with them. After doing this process for dozens of clients, here are our top 5 tips for finding reporters to cover your company.
 
1. Determine Who’s Covering Your Beat
If you haven’t gone to journalism school or aren’t a news geek, you may not realize that most reporters and producers cover a specific beat. This can be a geographical beat (very common for smaller newspapers, for example) or a topical beat (tech, startups, food, etc.). Once you understand this, it becomes easier to spot patterns in coverage and determine which reporters are consistently producing content on topic areas that align with your organization.
 
A few things to keep in mind:

  • Beats can go from general to specific. We like to note any particular quirks in a writer’s beat when we notice them, like specific categories they cover frequently or weekly columns, for example.
  • It’s often easy to find a reporter’s beat in their official bio or Twitter bio. They usually spell out their interests, so don’t overthink it.
  • The reporter’s beat should lead the style and content of your pitch. For most of our clients, we are pitching reporters working more than one beat – for example, entrepreneurship AND food – but we make sure to give the reporter the relevant info, not just a boilerplate pitch. What would they care about?

 
2. Check Out Who Competitors are Interacting with on Social
Aside from just finding writers who are clearly working relevant beats, another great way to source fresh reporters is to check out your competitors’ social media accounts. What reporters or media outlets are they following, who’s following them, and who are they interacting with?
 
This is a huge tip-off to who might be likely to cover your industry in the near or distant future, and you should get acquainted with relevant reporters before the story happens and you’re no a part of it.
 
 
3. Search for Stories That Are Similar – But Not the Same – As Yours
Pitching a reporter on a story they’ve already done is tempting. If they covered a competitor, why wouldn’t they want to cover you? But the fact of the matter is that most reporters will cover a topic once – after that, you need a fresh spin on the matter to gain coverage.
 
Instead of looking for stories that you “could have been” a part of, try seeking out stories that cover topics tangentially related to what your company does or the messaging you’re looking to put out. For example, if you’re pitching a summer angle on a food trend, you don’t want to pitch reporters who’ve already written that story. But finding writers who have covered seasonal food trends or summer farmer’s markets gives you an entrée into the pitch and a way to provide a new angle or value.
 
4. Keep Tabs on Twitter
Twitter is extremely helpful for media list research. Follow the reporters, writers and producers on your media list and create a filter to check out their tweets in an individual feed (using social media management tools) so you can keep up on their interests. Create separate categories of hashtags and keywords that are relevant to your business and keep tabs on that to ensure you’re not missing any topical reporter queries.
 
You can also use Twitter to research the right contacts if you already have a target outlet in mind. For example, searching “New York Times parenting reporter” or “WCVB assignment editor” may lead you to the Twitter handle of the right person.
 
5. Be Helpful
Once you’ve curated your media list, find ways to be helpful to them and develop relationships. On occasion, this may have no immediate benefit to you. Perhaps you’ve received interesting stats that are relevant to their beat, come across an infographic or met an expert that would make a great source for an upcoming story. See a story you’d like to have been included in? Introduce yourself to the reporter and provide value-added info – not to convince them to add you or rewrite the story (not gonna happen) but to help them in the future.

PR TIPS: HOW DO YOU ENSURE YOU APPEAR IN A STORY

So often at Seven Hills, we have clients who come to us because they see a story and say, “I should have been in there!” It’s inevitable–and it happens to almost everyone. Lots of people think of PR as a way to bring story ideas to reporters–and that’s part of it. But just as important is making sure that your company or brand is mentioned when it’s appropriate in other stories.


Let’s face facts: in order to ensure that you appeared in every relevant story would mean you’d need to have a psychic hotline directly to reporters on your beat. Not happening. But while it’s impossible to know everything every reporter is considering reporting about, we here at SHC follow a few principles to help maximize our clients’ chances of appearing in relevant stories.

  • Knowledge of the landscape: The first thing you need to do is get a read on the media landscape for your industry (who writes about you) and monitor it. Set up Google alerts, put stuff in your reader, follow people on Twitter and ensure that you’re paying attention to what people are writing about so you can react when you need to.
  • Introductions: We very often will do basic introductions of new clients to the reporters on their relevant beat when we first take them on or when there’s a relevant news event happening. We’re not always pitching a story: we’re just letting them know that if and when they’re writing on the topic, they should keep us in mind. This helps avoid those, “Why weren’t we in that story?” moments later on. Most times, you’re not there because the reporter doesn’t even know you exist!
  • Joining listservs and monitoring social media: Everyone responsible for pitching media should be subscribing to HARO, probably the most popular place for journalists to put out calls for sources (and free!). You can also email relevant reporters and ask them to be added to their lists. Not all of them do this but many beat reporters will add good potential sources to blasts they send looking for sources on particular stories. Follow beat reporters on Twitter and keep tabs on relevant hashtags and search terms – reporters will often seek sources via social media.
  • Following up after a miss: Got one of those stories you “should have” been in? Be sure to follow up with the reporter and introduce yourself. They won’t write the same story again, but if they’ve written on a topic once, chances are they’ll revisit in the future and it’s important to be top of mind.
  • Shaping the message after an interview: When you finally do score that interview, part of the job of a good PR consultant is to do the relevant prep, arming you with the right messaging points, AND the relevant follow-ups, driving that messaging home with the reporter after an interview (when it’s not live of course). Getting across the right message is a large part of the value of appearing in a story. You can’t guarantee what a reporter will use, but with the right prep and good, relevant messaging you’re a big part of the way there!

We want to hear from you: what was that cringeworthy time that you realized you had missed out on a big press opportunity?